Step 4: Build the other side of the wall

Back                                                                           Forward

With one side of the wall done, the next step was to get the other side / panel of the wall to the same state of “done-ness”. To do this, I set up the partially completed panel as before but with the rounded (top) end on one of the tables and the end not covered by plywood yet supported by my workstands. I then set up the two main support beams for the second panel (not yet assembled) as before so that their round ends are set inside of the round ends of the support beams for the partially constructed panel and set their square ends (the bottoms) on the other 6 foot table. Again I threaded the rod through the outside rounded end of one of the support beams for the partially constructed panel, through the rounded end of one of the support beams for the second panel that I just positioned as described above, through the rounded end of the other support beam for the second panel again positioned as described above, and finally through the rounded end of the other support beam for the partially constructed panel. I then ran the other smooth rod through the holes in the square ends of the two support beams for the second panel and moved the second 6 foot table (currently supporting the square ends of these two support beams for the second panel) so that the rod was over the table and that when I would try to position the cross-beam that will run about 7 or so inches from the bottoms of these beams, it will be supported by the table as well. I then clamped the two support beams on each side together as shown in the following pictures.

Partially constructed second panel clamped to the first panel as described in the text. You can see the smooth rod that runs through the holes in this pic as well.

Partially constructed second panel clamped to the first panel as described in the text

Partially constructed second panel clamped to the first panel as described in the text (both sides)

Partially constructed second panel clamped to the first panel as described in the text (other side)

Side view showing the two panels main support beams clamped as per the description in the text

Side view showing the two panels main support beams clamped as per the description in the text

The two panels clamped together - view from the first panel's side

The two panels clamped together - view from the first panel's side

Note that these pics show the second panel after some of the cross-beams had already been cut and attached. I simply wanted to show the beams in position and clamped together correctly. This was done to ensure that I got an accurate distance reading between the two inner support beams (the ones for the second panel) so that I could measure and cut the cross-beam supports for the top and bottom accurately and get a nice, tight fit with the maximum distance possible between these beams.

Again, I ensured that these second panel support beams met the smooth rod running through its square ends at right angles before I made the measurements and fitted the cut pressure treated 2×4′s as when constructing the frame for the first panel. In fact, the construction of the second panel from this point goes exactly as it did for the first one up to the point of attaching the big piece of plywood (again you have to cut the one end at the same 45 degree bevel as you did for the one on the first panel).

I said I wouldn’t mention it again, but I am going to anyway. Make sure you check the free movement of the rods during this construction/assembly step as well. This is important so … well … I said it again.

Ok. So now I am assuming that you have completed the construction of the second panel’s frame and that you are now ready to attach your second bevel-cut piece of plywood to the top of this second panel’s frame.

The next step is to pull out the rod joining the two panels together and insert the PVC pipe with end caps in place between the two sets of support beams and then thread that steel rod back through all of the holes again. This is so that we can fit that piece of plywood into place as we did for the first panel — getting it as high up on the frame as possible but without binding or encumbering the ability of the PVC pipe (with end caps) to rotate about that rod nor preventing the rounded ends of the support beams from either panel from being able to rotate about the rod either.

Here is a pic showing this all set up and ready to position that piece of plywood on that second frame

Two panels assembled and ready to have the plywood positioned on the second panel's frame.

Two panels assembled and ready to have the plywood positioned on the second panel's frame.

Now simply put the plywood on the second frame and, as we did for the first frame, move it up against the PVC pipe and then clamp it down allowing it to slide back down along the frame as you clamp down.

NOTE that the sides of this piece of plywood will overhang the beams by about 1.5″ on each side. This is by design … you didn’t make a mistake :)

Now, loosen the clamps and move the plywood back down the ramp a little bit more to give it some room. Clamp all 4 corners and then pull the supports out from the back side of the first panel (or pull the table out from under the square end (bottom) of the second panel) and lower the bottom end of the first (or second) panel to the ground taking note of whether the plywood on the second frame rubs or binds against either the end caps, PVC pipe and/or the rounded ends of the support beams from ether panel. If it does, restore the bottom end of the panel you lowered back to “level” and replace the supports (or table), loosen the clamps on the plywood, reposition it accordingly, reclamp and repeat the test. Repeat this until you have the second piece of plywood optimally positioned on the second frame (of course it has to be square on that second frame as well.

When I had everything optimally positioned, I found that I had a space of about 2″ or so between the two pieces of plywood with the white PVC pipe centered between them. I spin the PVC pipe freely by sort of running my hand across the gap and brushing the pipe lying just below the surface of the two pieces of plywood. Nice!

Now, screw down the plywood as you did for the first panel using the 3″ deck screws.

The next pics show the two panels fully assembled except for the smaller pieces of plywood at the bottoms, the carpeting, cleats, safety chain, axles and wheels. We are getting close !!!!!

Partially assembled wall - laid flat

Partially assembled wall - laid flat

Partially assembled wall - laid flat - looking across the center (apex)

Partially assembled wall - laid flat - looking across the center (apex)

Partially assembled wall - laid flat - three quarter view

Partially assembled wall - laid flat - three quarter view

Partially assembled wall - Apex raised slightly - 3/4 view

Partially assembled wall - Apex raised slightly - 3/4 view

Partially assembled wall - Apex raised slightly - looking across apex

Partially assembled wall - Apex raised slightly - looking across apex

Back                                                                           Forward

blog comments powered by Disqus