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Materials list, sources and my costs

The following is a materials and parts list for this project. I will update this list as I work through the project. Right now, I think this is pretty much all I will need to finish the job but you never know …

  • Wood (bought mine at Home Depot and at Lowes)
    • Pressure Treated
      • (2) 2×4′s 16 feet long
        • Each cut in half for easy transport
        • These will form the support beams for the panels
      • (4) 2×4′s 12 feet long
        • Each cut in half for easy transport
        • These will be used for the cross-beams and vertical supports for the panels
    • Regular
      • (4) 4′x8′ sheets of 3/4″, finished one side plywood.
        • Pick a nice grade. This will be used as decking on the panels
        • Have the store cut these as follows:
          • Cut two pieces along the short side to get two pieces measuring 59″ x 48″. The remainder of these two pieces is scrap (use on another project :) )
          • Cut two pieces along the short side to get two pieces measuring 59″ x 27″.
            • Actually this is probably wasteful since we don’t really need the full 27″. If we can get away with 24″, we can go down to 3 pieces instead of 4. I’ll have to see what the final measurement of that bottom piece of plywood will be but it might actually work out to allow us to eliminate one of these pieces of plywood — sweet!
      • (1) 5/4 x 8, 10 feet long. This will be used to make the cleats
        • The 5/4″ size (yes, they actually describe it as 5/4″ and not 1 and 1/4″ ) has a finished thickness of almost exactly 1″ (actually it is about 1 and 1/16″ but that is acceptably close enough for our purposes … and actually gives us a little more strength and “padding” on top of the threaded inserts).
        • Pick a really nice quality wood for this. Hardwood is best.
        • Remember that these cleats will probably be subjected to the most stress and strain of any single element of this wall (with the dogs jumping up and using them as braces and climbing aids). You will be attaching these to the panels using threaded wood inserts and bolts so it is VERY important that this wood be tough enough to be able to hold those inserts without letting them go.
        • I went with a really nice piece of Red Oak. Expensive, but it will definitely not let me down in terms of “holding power”. The cost was about $77 for this one piece of wood plus the cutting fee to have them rip it down to 2″ wide and then cut the slices in half to make their finished size be 1″x2″x5′ long pieces. I got 6 of these pieces plus a few scraps out of the single 5/4″x8″x10′ board.
        • The 5/4″ size is really hard to find. Look to your smaller, local lumber yards. I did find top grade pine in the 5/4 x 6 size at Home Depot but they did not have any hardwoods in this configuration. They should be able to give you some references to local sawmills at the contractor’s desk though.
      • (1) 2×6 as short as you can get. This will be used to “punch out” circular pieces of wood for use in making the end caps for the PVC pipe.
        • Pick a nice quality wood for this but make sure it is pine or birch or something relatively easy to shape with a sanding wheel.
        • You only need to get 3 or 4 discs about 5″ across each out of it for a total length of 20-24″. If you are really good and don’t mess up, you can get away with a board only 1 foot long but I’d give myself at least 2 just to be safe in case you do mess up.
        • This was cheap — under $5
      • (1) 1×6 as short as you can get. This will be used to “punch out” circular pieces of wood for use in making the end caps for the PVC pipe.
        • Same as with the 2×6.
        • This was also cheap — under $5
  • Steel Rod
    • Threaded
      • (1) 6′ long piece of 3/4″ threaded rod
        • Depending on the size of your Lowes/Home Depot, they may or may not carry this in stock. I found it at Lowes for about $20 or so.
        • plated with some shiny or rust-resistant metal would be best
        • This will be used to hold the panels together and to hold the PVC pipe in place.
      • (2) 7′ long pieces of 3/4″ smooth steel rod
        • Not easy to find. Check with your local steel fabrication/welding shops. That was where I got mine. Both pieces together cost $22 (including cutting charges)
        • Best would be cold-rolled steel if you can get it. Hot-rolled will do if you get stuck.
        • These will be used as “axles” to help move the wall around after construction as well as aids in getting everything lined up and square during construction.
  • Hardware
    • (30) Inserts for wood cleats (5 per cleat, 6 cleats)
      • I purchased these at Woodcraft.com. The product link is http://www.woodcraft.com/family.aspx?familyid=1048&productid=11M30&mode=details
      • Price is $6.99 for a package of 10. I bought 4 packages (gotta have extras in my book)
      • The item number is #11M30 and they are described as “Threaded Inserts”.
      • They have a length of 9/16″, use a 1/2″ pilot hole 1/2″ and have thread size of 3/8″-24.
      • NOTE: The bolts that go with this are more difficult to find than the 3/8″-16 and are thus more expensive so you might want to go with #11M40 instead. Just so you know. However, I did some research on these and the 3/8″-16 holds about 300-400 pounds less than the 3/8″-24 … but considering both of them are rated at over 2000 pounds, I think you are safe to go with the coarser threaded 3/8″-16′s. For more info on this see http://www.curiousinventor.com/guides/Metal_Working/Screws#sizing
      • While you are at the woodcraft site, you might want to pick up #12F23 which is a T-wrench for helping to insert these inserts into your wood without wreaking the threads. ($4.99)
    • (32) Gussett Angle brackets ($0.50-0.70 each)
      • These are called Simpson Strong-Tie angle brackets and I found them at Home Depot. You want the “GA2″ (6 screw holes) and not the “GA1″ (only 4 holes) but the GA1 would do in a pinch.
    • (2) Wide D-Shackles (1/2″). These are to anchor the safety chains to the center vertical support members. These are chrome plated beauties that hold well over 1000 pounds each. Best source I was able to find was in Canada at Stainless Steel Direct at www.stainless-steel-direct.com. These units had product code S0114-0012 and were $13.29 each. Shipping was an extra $13 or so since these things weigh half a pound each!
    • (20 feet) of chrome-plated, heavy duty chain with a load test rating of 1200 pounds or greater. This will set you back $20 or so at Home Depot.
  • Pipe
    • (2) 2 foot lengths of thick walled, 3/4″ copper tubing (7/8″ outside diameter, 1/16″ thick walls, usually lettered with blue letters). This will be cut up and used to line the inside of the holes in the end caps for the PVC Pipe as well as the holes in the 2×4 support beams.
    • (1) 6 foot length of 4″ PVC pipe (I got white pipe). Outside diameter is about 4.50″, inside diameter is about 4.00″
  • Wheels and Cotter pins
    • (4) 10″ diameter, pneumatic filled utility tires to help move the wall around
      • I got these at Wheeleez online (http://www.wheeleez.com/utilitywheels.php). They were about $12 each. Great price and great product. You want the wheels which have a 3/4″ bushing diameter. I got 4 of item WZ1-26PR.
    • 4 cotter pins (to help hold the wheels on the axles).
  • Nuts, washers, screws and bolts
    • (2) Rust-resistant (shiny metal plated) nuts for the 3/4″ threaded rod
    • (2) Rust-resistant (shiny metal plated) fender (or regular) washers for the 3/4″ threaded rod
    • (8) Rust-resistant (shiny metal plated) fender (or regular) washers for the 3/4″ smooth rods
    • (2) boxes of 100 count #8 x 1″ stainless wood screws. These are used to secure the angle supports each of which takes 6 screws. Cheap … don’t remember how much they were.
    • (30) 3×8″-24 (or “fine threaded machine screws”). These will be expensive — between $0.30 and $0.80 each depending on where you get them. I got mine at Home Depot for about $0.35 each.
    • (32) 1/4″ Lag bolts 3.5″ long each. ($0.30-$0.50 each)
    • (32) washers for the lag bolts ($0.10 to $0.20 each)
    • (150-200) 3″ deck screws (usually green in color) to secure the plywood decking to the frames
    • (4) #8 x 1.5″ screws ( to screw the pieces of the end caps together

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