New Design

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An improved design – my changes to current designs

So, what did I do differently? Many things. Here is a list:

1. Use 2×4′s mounted on their narrow ends to avoid “sway back” over time of the panels.

2. Extend the 2×4′s at the top, and use an axle through them to secure the apex.

3. Use a piece of PVC pipe at the apex (running along the 59″ width) with the axle mentioned in (2) running through its center to eliminate the “gap” at the apex.

4. Use “knock-down furniture” metal inserts on the backs of the cleats (wood threads on the outside of them, machine threads on the inside of them) with bolts extending through the plywood from the back to secure the cleats to the plywood. This eliminates any sign of the method by which they are secured to the wall when viewed from the front and eliminates any chance of screws or bolts becoming a hazard to the participants.

5. Use reinforcing 2×4′s in the frame to provide extra support and a base into which to screw the plywood seam edges down.

6. Provide a way to attach wheels to the botom of the panels for easy transportation when needed and ensure they are easy to remove once the wall is in position and ready for use.

7. Move the bottom width-wise 2×4 up from the base of the panels by 7-10″. Move the edge of the plywood up as well by at least 2″. This will provide an air space between the ground and the majority of the wall structure and covering to make trimming grass easy and to prevent the ground contact from rotting out the wall prematurely. The bottoms of the 2×4′s which touch the ground can be layered in some zinc-coated thin metal to protect them from the whipper-snipper. Also, by having the structure supported by 2×4′s (4 of them in total) touching the ground in 4 places, will result in a more stable wall.

So let’s look at some screen captures of my initial design sketches out of CorelDraw (http://www.corel.com), my vector drawing package of choice.

This first drawing, shows the wall collapsed flat on the ground:

Initial Schutzhund Wall Plan - Side view

Initial Schutzhund Wall Plan - Side view

This drawing shows the two panels of the wall lying end-to-end. You can see that the ends of the 2×4′s have been shaped to follow a circular contour on the end nearest the center of the wall (the apex, when it is standing up). The main axle or tie rod will run through all of the main 2×4′s through the center of that circular contour. You can also see two holes drilled in the bottoms of each of the main 2×4 supports. These holes will accomodate axles on which wheels will be mounted.

The next drawing shows the same picture as above, just zoomed in on the ends of the two panels (the black jagged line indicates the cut out sections of the pannels)

Close up of side view of wall lying flat on the ground

Close up of side view of wall lying flat on the ground

The next drawing, shows the wall as described for the first diagram, but as viewed from above. Actually it is more as though viewed from below, since the support members are visible and would not be visible from to top unless you could see through plywood and carpeting :)

Schutzhund Wall laid flat on the ground.

Schutzhund Wall laid flat on the ground.

In this drawing you can see the beginnings of the 2×4 structure that will support the plywood panels. Also you can see the red PVC pipe in place in the middle with the gray axles in place in the middle as well as at the ends. The black rectangles on the outter axles represent the small, 10″ diameter tires that will be used. Notice how the left panel’s main 2×4′s interlock with the ones on the right. This will result in a 1.5″ hang over of the plywood on that left side, but it should not pose a problem with 3/4″ thick plywood.

The next two drawings show the wall in the elevated position (ready for competition) both the “full view” and a close up of the apex.

Proposed design showing the wall in the elevated position.

Proposed design showing the wall in the elevated position.

Close up of the Apex of the wall in elevated configuration.

Close up of the Apex of the wall in elevated configuration.

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  • Pancho

    Hello Peter, I was wondering how did you overcome the issue with the big plywood panels that were hard to obtain.

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